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Thread: Coconut oil spray - Con

  1. #1
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    Coconut oil spray - Con

    I went to purchase some spray coconut oil to limit my overuse of coconut oil and eventually found it in the supermarket much to my delight, there was even a picture of a fresh coconut on the label with the words coconut oil plastered on it.

    So, just before putting in my basket, I thought I’d just check the ingredients. I was shocked to find that the coconut oil contained only 35% coconut oil with the rest being made up from sunflower and rapeseed oil, both products I wouldn’t touch ordinarily. I think this is disgusting and false advertising.

  2. #2
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    Ive seen this happen with a lot of so called healthy foods, it is always advisable to look at the total ingredients of any product, when you do it frequently, you soon learn to scan a product. I have to agree with you, I think it is false advertising, But in real terms they could argue that the main ingredient is coconut oil at 35% whereas the other oils are only 30% each, leaving 5% for the usual chemicals to stop this stuff going off.

  3. #3
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    Is it a con or clever marketing? Does the bottle say 100% coconut oil?

    Many companies use this type of marketing to get people to buy their products, clever wording and picture, helps busy people to choose their product over other options.

  4. #4
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    Take this as an example...
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    Now, let me first point out, I am partial to these sweets, so I am not knocking the product, but simply highlight the use of clever marketing. The product has Natural emblazoned across it, after all thats the companies name, it then goes on the highlight it has no artificial flavourings or preservatives, which would suggest that the product itself is natural.

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    Yet the ingredient list reads somewhat less healthy, although I do understand that sugar is a processed natural product, the product is less healthy than it first appears.
    This is clever marketing, if you are a busy parent, your child is screaming for sweets, you want to do right by your children, you go for the 'healthiest' option of all the sweets. I understand the product doesn't specify it is healthy, but the wording is very deliberate to build a picture up in our mind that this is a healthier option.

  5. #5
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    I’m sorry Sian, I have to agree with Aletheariggs, whilst it may seem like a con, it is just clever marketing. Many of the health food products have clever marketing ploys, while cramming loads of sugars or processed ingredients into them. You were and are right to read labels.

  6. #6
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    Does anyone actually buy sugary jelly’s actually believing they are naturally healthy?

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